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Anti-Racist Action Week

Our commitment to anti-racism runs deeper than a single day or week. Many of our white siblings and friends are asking, “What can I do? What are meaningful steps I can take to change my life to begin smashing white supremacy?” We’ve organized a week of practical ways for our community to grapple with the hard feelings, issues and realities of white supremacy.

Sunday, May 31

We hosted our first ever Solidarity Worship experience on June 1. Pastor Wendy was joined by special guests as we discussed how to live into our calling to be an anti-racist Christian community. You can re-watch the service here:

Monday, June 1

Charleston Area Justice Ministry (CAJM) Zoom Call at 6:30 p.m.

We’ll join our community partners at CAJM for a virtual gathering to advocate for a racial bias audit of the City of North Charleston Police Department.

If you’d like to join the Zoom call, send us an email at connect@tworiverschs.org

Tuesday, June 2

Try it Tuesday: Supporting Black-Owned Businesses at 7 p.m.

For this week’s Try it Tuesday, our own Akua Page will join us to talk about how to become an active supporter of black-owned businesses in our greater Charleston community.

Wednesday, June 3

I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness Book Club at 8 p.m.

Join us for the first week of our new book club led by Kenya Cummings and Julie Keyes. We will study “I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness” by Austin Channing Brown. The book club will meet every other week.

Thursday, June 4

Support and Shop with a local black-owned business

Join us in supporting one of our local black-owned businesses. You can find our listing of Black/POC/Woman/LGBTQIA+ owned business in Charleston here. If you would like to add a business to this listing, send us an email at connect@tworiverschs.org.

Friday, June 5

Support a Black-owned restaurant for Black Food Friday

Join us in supporting one of our local black-owned restaurants.

Our Commitment to Anti-Racism

At Two Rivers Church, we commit our church community fully to the work of anti-racism. The arc of Scripture is clear that all humans are children of God, created equal: 

“There is neither Jew nor Greek; there is neither slave nor free; nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28).

We reject the norms, expectations and traditions of the church powered by whiteness. How does this commitment look in our community? Being anti-racist means we amplify and center the voices of Black, indigenous and people of color in our leadership, our resources and our conversations. We spend our money in black-owned businesses. We are solidarity partners, coming in at the invitation of organizations led by people of color and taking their lead. Our staff engages in regular anti-racism training. As individuals and as leadership, we speak out when we confront racism in our personal lives, our structures and our communities.